6 Books for Spring

Looking for a good spring read? Here are a few suggestions from website, Books on the Table. All of these titles (and lots more!) can be found at the library.

Alternate Side – Anna Quindlen
Some days Nora Nolan thinks that she and her husband, Charlie, lead a charmed life. And why not? New York City was once Nora’s dream destination, and her clannish dead-end block has become a safe harbor. Then one morning she returns from her run to discover that a terrible incident has shaken the neighborhood, and the fault lines begin to open.

Prairie Fires – Caroline Fraser
This book is a thoroughly researched biography of not only Laura Ingalls Wilder, but of her daughter, Rose. Using unpublished manuscripts, letters, financial records, and more, Fraser gives fresh insight into the life of a woman beloved to many.

The Friend – Sigrid Nunez
When a woman unexpectedly loses her lifelong best friend and mentor, she finds herself burdened with the unwanted dog he has left behind. Her own battle against grief is intensified by the mute suffering of the dog and by the threat of eviction. While others worry that grief has made her a victim of magical thinking, the woman refuses to be separated from the dog except for brief periods of time.

Laura & Emma – Kate Greathead
Laura hails from the Upper East Side of Manhattan. One weekend she meets Jefferson. The two sleep together. He vanishes and Laura realizes she’s pregnant. Despite her progressive values, Laura raises her daughter Emma by herself in the same blue-blood world of private schools and summer homes she grew up in. Her eccentric mother, who informs her society friends and Emma herself that she was fathered by a Swedish sperm donor. Meanwhile, the apple falls far from the tree with Emma, who begins to question her environment in a way her mother never could.

The Female Persuasion – Meg Wolitzer
Greer Kadetsky is a shy college freshman when she meets the woman she hopes will change her life. Faith Frank has been a central pillar of the women’s movement for decades, a figure who inspires others to influence the world. Upon hearing Faith speak for the first time, Greer feels her inner world light up.

The Girl Who Smiled Beads – Clemantine Wamariya
Wamariya was six years old in 1994, and in 100 days more than 800,000 people would be murdered in Rwanda and millions more displaced. Clemantine and her sister ran and spent the next six years wandering through seven African countries searching for safety. They did not know whether their parents were alive. At age twelve, Clemantine and her sister were granted asylum in the United States.

For the full article, visit
6 Books to Read This Spring

-Claire

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Local Best-Sellers

The following titles are some of the best sellers this week at the Lake Forest Book Store.

Celine – Peter Heller
The story of Celine, an elegant, aristocratic private eye who specializes in reuniting families, trying to make amends for a loss in her own past

I’ve Been Thinking – Maria Shriver
Shriver shares inspiring quotes, prayers, and reflections designed to get readers thinking, get them feeling, get them laughing, and help them in their journey to what she calls The Open Field–a place of acceptance, purpose, and passion–a place of joy.

Lillian Boxfish Takes a Walk – Kathleen Rooney
A portrait of a remarkable woman across the canvas of a changing America: from the Jazz Age to the onset of the AIDS epidemic; the Great Depression to the birth of hip-hop. Lillian figures she might as well take her time. For now, after all, the night is still young

My Dear Hamiltron – Stephanie Dray
The epic story of Eliza Schuyler Hamilton—a revolutionary woman who, like her new nation, struggled to define herself in the wake of war, betrayal, and tragedy.

Out of the Shadows – Mark Litzinger
Depression had its claws in Mark Litzsinger for years, but by taking the hands offered to him from family, friends, and medical professionals, he was able to climb out of the shadows and back into his life.

Rocket Men – Robert Kurson
The inside story of the dangerous Apollo 8 mission, while illuminating the political factors that prompted the decision to risk lives to save the Apollo program and define the space race.

True Roots – Kristin Cavallari
Cavallari shows you that improving the way you eat doesn’t have to be difficult–a clean and toxin-free diet can and should be fun, easy, and enjoyable. She learned the hard way that dieting leads nowhere good, and that a clean lifestyle is the ticket to feeling and being healthy.

-Claire

Local Favorites – April 13th

The following titles are current best sellers this week at the Lake Forest Book Store. You can find many of these books and lots more on the shelves at the library!

Celine – Peter Heller
An elegant, aristocratic private eye who specializes in reuniting families, tries to make amends for a loss in her own past.

I’ve Been Thinking… – Maria Shriver
Shriver shares inspiring quotes, prayers, and reflections designed to get readers thinking, get them feeling, get them laughing, and help them in their journey to what she calls The Open Field–a place of acceptance, purpose, and passion–a place of joy.

My Dear Hamilton – Stephanie Dray & Laura Kamoie
The epic story of Eliza Schuyler Hamilton—a revolutionary woman who, like her new nation, struggled to define herself in the wake of war, betrayal, and tragedy.

Chicago – David Mamet
Mobbed-up 1920s Chicago: a city where some people knew too much, and where everyone should have known better. Mike Hodge, veteran of the Great War, big shot of the Chicago Tribune, probably shouldn’t have fallen in love with Annie Walsh. Then, again, maybe the man who killed Annie Walsh have known better than to trifle with Mike Hodge.

Little Fires Everywhere – Celeste Ng
In Shaker Heights, a placid, progressive suburb of Cleveland, everything is planned – from the layout of the winding roads, to the colors of the houses, to the successful lives its residents will go on to lead. And no one embodies this spirit more than Elena Richardson, whose guiding principle is playing by the rules.

The Alice Network – Kate Quinn
It’s 1947 and American college girl Charlie St. Clair is pregnant, unmarried, and on the verge of being thrown out of her very proper family. She’s also nursing a fervent belief that her beloved French cousin Rose, who disappeared in Nazi-occupied France during the war, might still be alive somewhere. So when Charlie’s family banishes her to Europe to have her “little problem” take care of, Charlie breaks free and heads to London determined to find out what happened to the cousin she loves like a sister.

Dear Girl – Amy Krouse Rosenthal
Encourages readers to accept and love themselves as they are and advises them to be confident, curious, adaptable, and willing to speak up.

Educated – Tara Westover
Westover was born to survivalists in the mountains of Idaho. She prepared for the end of the world by stockpiling food and sleeping with her “head-for-the-hills bag.” The family was so isolated from mainstream society that there was no one to ensure the children received an education, and no one to intervene when one of Tara’s older brothers became violent. As a way out, Tara began to educate herself, learning enough mathematics and grammar to be admitted to Brigham Young University.

Magpie Murders – Anthony Horowitz
A brilliant and strikingly original reimagining of the classic whodunit (a la Agatha Christie) with a contemporary mystery wrapped around it

True Roots – Kristin Cavallari
In her first book, Kristin Cavallari shared her personal journey along with her tips on everything from style to relationships. Now, Cavallari shows you that improving the way you eat doesn’t have to be difficult–a clean and toxin-free diet can and should be fun, easy, and enjoyable.

-Claire

Afternoon Book Club – May

(May) Nothing to Envy

Summary – Award winning journalist Barbara Demick follows the lives of six North Koreans over a period of fifteen years through a chaotic period that saw the death of Kim Il-Sung, his son Kim Jong-Il’s rise to power, and a devastating famine that killed one-fifth of the population. Demick shows what it means to live under a repressive totalitarian regime. A world that is not connected to the Internet, displays of affection are often punished, informants are rewarded, and how a simple joke or remark can send a person to a prison camp for life. Through Demick’s journey, we see how North Koreans have dealt with the profound, life-altering disillusionment of their government and realizing how much their country and their government have betrayed them.

Read-Alikes – If you enjoyed this book and are seeking similar titles, here are a few to consider: A River in Darkness by Masaji Ishakawa, A World in Disarray by Robert Haass, My Holiday in North Korea by Wendy E. Simmons, The Great Leader and the Fighter Pilot by Blaine Harden, and Without You, There Is No Us by Suki Kim.

Book Club – Nothing to Envy will be Carol’s afternoon book club selection for May. Copies of the book will be available at the Circulation Desk. Book Club will meet on Tuesday May 15th at 2:30pm.

-Claire

Happy National Library Week

national library week 2018
From April 8th – 14th, libraries observe National Library Week. First sponsored in 1958, National Library Week is a national observance sponsored by the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries across the country each April. It is a time to celebrate the contributions of our nation’s libraries and librarians and to promote library use and support. All types of libraries – school, public, academic and special – participate.

In the mid-1950s, research showed that Americans were spending less on books and more on radios, televisions and musical instruments. Concerned that Americans were reading less, the ALA and the American Book Publishers formed a nonprofit citizens organization called the National Book Committee in 1954. The committee’s goals were ambitious. They ranged from “encouraging people to read in their increasing leisure time” to “improving incomes and health” and “developing strong and happy family life.”

In 1957, the committee developed a plan for National Library Week based on the idea that once people were motivated to read, they would support and use libraries. With the cooperation of ALA and with help from the Advertising Council, the first National Library Week was observed in 1958 with the theme “Wake Up and Read!”

National Library Week was observed again in 1959, and the ALA Council voted to continue the annual celebration. When the National Book Committee disbanded in 1974, ALA assumed full sponsorship.

Come stop by the library this week to see all of the exciting materials, programs, digital resources, children’s programming and more than we have to offer!

Local Favorites: April 6th

The following books are current best-sellers this week at the Lake Forest Book Store and can be found on the shelves at the library.

Beartown – Fredrik Backman
Winning a junior ice hockey championship might not mean a lot to the average person, but it means everything to the residents of Beartown. A victory like this would draw national attention to the ailing town and mean everything to Amat, a short, scrawny teenager who is treated like an outcast everywhere but on the ice; to Kevin, a star player just on the cusp of securing his golden future in the NHL; and to Peter, their dedicated general manager whose own professional hockey career ended in tragedy.

Celine – Peter Heller
A luminous, spine-tingling novel of suspense. The story of Celine, an elegant, aristocratic private eye who specializes in reuniting families, trying to make amends for a loss in her own past.

Chicago – David Mamet
Mobbed-up 1920s Chicago: a city where some people knew too much, and where everyone should have known better. Mike Hodge, probably shouldn’t have fallen in love with Annie Walsh. Then, again, maybe the man who killed Annie Walsh have known better than to trifle with Mike Hodge.

I’ve Been Thinking… – Maria Shriver
In this moving and powerful book, Shriver shares inspiring quotes, prayers, and reflections designed to get readers thinking, get them feeling, get them laughing, and help them in their journey to what she calls The Open Field–a place of acceptance, purpose, and passion–a place of joy.

Magpie Murders – Anthony Horowitz
A brilliant and strikingly original reimagining of the classic whodunit (a la Agatha Christie) with a contemporary mystery wrapped around it.

Munich – Robert Harris
A new spy thriller about treason and conscience, loyalty and betrayal, set against the backdrop of the fateful Munich Conference of September 1938.

The Heart’s Invisible Furies – John Boyne
Adopted by a well-to-do if eccentric Dublin couple who remind him that he is not a real member of their family, Cyril embarks on a journey to find himself and where he came from, discovering his identity, a home, a country, and much more throughout a long lifetime.

-Claire

DNA Testing: Cold Cases Solved

Our program DNA Testing: Cold Cases Solved will be held on Thursday April 19th at 7:00pm. Registration is not required and all are welcome to attend!

A criminal case becomes “cold” when all available information has been exhausted. Decades old cold cases can now be solved using sophisticated forensic DNA Testing. Join Dr. Hal Tinberg and learn how this technology, along with the work of dedicated police detectives, has solved such baffling cases as the Southland Strangler and the Grim Sleeper murders, and the oldest DNA cold case in US history. Dr. Hal Tinberg is retired from Abbott Laboratories and currently lectures on forensic science.

Here are some books that you can find in our library about Forensics, Cold Cases, and DNA testing.

Blood, Bullets, and Bones – Bridget Heos
Provides young readers with a fresh and fascinating look at the ever-evolving science of forensics.

One Doctor – Brendan Reilly, M.D.
As Reilly’s patients and their families confront the limits of medicine’s power to cure, One Doctor lays bare a fragmented, depersonalized, business-driven health care system where real caring is hard to find.

The Drop – Michael Connelly
Harry Bosch has been given three years before he must retire from the LAPD, and he wants cases more fiercely than ever. In one morning, he gets two. DNA from a 1989 rape and murder matches a 29-year-old convicted rapist. Was he an eight-year-old killer or has something gone terribly wrong in the new Regional Crime Lab?

Blood Secrets – Rod Englert
Reveals how forensic experts read the story of a murder told in the traces of blood left behind, providing crucial evidence that has helped convict criminals who might have otherwise walked free.

Out of Bounds – Val McDermid
When a teenage joyrider crashes a stolen car and ends up in a coma, a routine DNA test reveals a connection to an unsolved murder from twenty-two years before. It’s a cold case that should be straightforward. But it’s as twisted as the DNA helix itself.

The Language of Life – Francis S. Collins
Offers practical advice on how to utilize medical, scientific, and genetic discoveries for you and your family’s current and future health and well-being.

I’ll Be Gone in the Dark – Michelle McNamara
For more than ten years, a mysterious and violent predator committed fifty sexual assaults in Northern California before moving south, where he perpetrated ten sadistic murders. Then he disappeared, eluding capture by multiple police forces and some of the best detectives in the area.

Forensics – Val McDermid
Forensic scientists can unlock the mysteries of the past and help serve justice using the messages left by a corpse, a crime scene, or the faintest of human traces.

The Central Park Five – Sarah Burns
In this spellbinding account of the real facts of the Central Park jogger case, Sarah Burns powerfully reexamines one of New York City’s most notorious crimes and its aftermath.

-Claire