National Poetry Month

National Poetry Month, which takes place each April, is a celebration of poetry introduced in 1996 and organized by the Academy of American Poets as a way to increase awareness and appreciation of poetry in the United States. Here are some poetry books you can find at the Lake Bluff Public Library. If you’re looking for more, our poetry section is on our second floor in the 811’s.

Jabberwocky & Other Poems – Lewis Carroll
An illustrated version of the classic nonsense poem from “Through the Looking Glass”.

That Little Something – Charles Simic
The superb eighteenth collection from one of America’s most vital and honored poets. Over the course of his singular career, Charles Simic has won nearly every accolade, including the Pulitzer Prize, and he served as the poet laureate of the United States from 2007 to 2008. His wry humor and darkly illuminating vision are on full display here as he moves close to the dark ironies of history and human experience.

The Ode Less Travelled – Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry believes that if one can speak and read English, one can write poetry. In The Ode Less Travelled, he invites readers to discover the delights of writing poetry for pleasure and provides the tools and confidence to get started.

Never Broken – Jewel
When Jewel’s first album, Pieces of You, topped the charts in 1995, her emotional voice and vulnerable performance were groundbreaking. Drawing comparisons to Joan Baez and Joni Mitchell, a singer-songwriter of her kind had not emerged in decades. Now, with more than thirty million albums sold worldwide, Jewel tells the story of her life, and the lessons learned from her experience and her music.

The Complete Poetry – Maya Angelou
Throughout her illustrious career in letters, Maya Angelou gifted, healed, and inspired the world with her words. Now the beauty and spirit of those words live on in this new and complete collection of poetry that reflects and honors the writer’s remarkable life.

The Poetry of Robert Frost – Robert Frost
The only comprehensive volume of Robert Frost’s published verse containing all eleven of his individual books of poetry, from A Boy’s Will (1913) to In the Clearing (1962).

Poetry in Person – Alexander Neubauer
In the fall of 1970, at the New School in Greenwich Village, a new teacher posted a flyer on the wall,” begins Alexander Neubauer’s introduction to this remarkable book. “It read ‘Meet Poets and Poetry, with Pearl London and Guests.’” Few students responded. No one knew Pearl London, the daughter of M. Lincoln Schuster, cofounder of Simon & Schuster.

Red Bird – Mary Oliver
Mary Oliver’s twelfth book of poetry, Red Bird comprises sixty-one poems, the most ever in a single volume of her work. Overflowing with her keen observation of the natural world and her gratitude for its gifts, for the many people she has loved in her seventy years, as well as for her disobedient dog Percy.

The Door – Margaret Atwood
Margaret Atwood’s first book of poetry since Morning in the Burned House, is a magnificent achievement. Brave and compassionate, The Door interrogates the certainties that we build our lives on, and reminds us once again of Margaret Atwood’s unique accomplishments as one of the finest and most celebrated writers of our time.

Time and the Tilting Earth – Miller Williams
Time and the Tilting Earth shows Miller Williams at his sharpest. When he tells us “it’s hard to be understood and make that look easy,” he describes his own poetry perfectly. This latest effort from Williams provides a collection of rhythmical poems in conversational language about the nature of human beings and the world in which we live.

-Claire

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