Read-Alikes: Furiously Happy

On August 17, our book club “Beyond the Books @ Wisma” read Furiously Happy by Jenny Lawson. If you attended our book club and are looking for something similar, here are some suggestions:

An Unquiet Mind – Kay Redfield Robison
Jamison examines bipolar illness from the dual perspectives of the healer and the healed, revealing both its terrors and the cruel allure that at times prompted her to resist taking medication.

The Girl with the Lower Back Tattoo – Amy Schumer
The Emmy Award-winning comedian, actress, writer, and star of Inside Amy Schumer and the acclaimed film Trainwreck has taken the entertainment world by storm with her winning blend of smart, satirical humor. Now, Amy Schumer has written a refreshingly candid and uproariously funny collection of (extremely) personal and observational essays.

Monkey Mind – Daniel Smith
A wildly acclaimed New York Times bestseller, this uplifting, smart, and funny memoir provides hope and understanding to the 40 million Americans who suffer from anxiety disorders.

Bossypants – Tina Fey
At last, Tina Fey’s story can be told. From her youthful days as a vicious nerd to her tour of duty on Saturday Night Live; from her passionately halfhearted pursuit of physical beauty to her life as a mother eating things off the floor; from her one-sided college romance to her nearly fatal honeymoon — from the beginning of this paragraph to this final sentence.

Laughing at My Nightmare – Shane Burcaw
With acerbic wit and a hilarious voice, Shane Burcaw’s Laughing at My Nightmare describes the challenges he faces as a twenty-one-year-old with spinal muscular atrophy. From awkward handshakes to having a girlfriend and everything in between, Shane handles his situation with humor and a “you-only-live-once” perspective on life. While he does talk about everyday issues that teens can relate to, he also offers an eye-opening perspective on what it is like to have a life threatening disease.

Me Talk Pretty One Day  -David Sedaris
Humorist David Sedaris, presents a collection of his strongest work yet, including the title story about his hilarious attempt to learn French.

Look Me in the Eye – John Elder Robison
Ever since he was young, John Robison longed to connect with other people, but by the time he was a teenager, his odd habits had earned him the label “social deviant.” It was not until he was forty that he was diagnosed with a form of autism called Asperger’s syndrome.

-Claire

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